Noisette – New Development Project in South Caroina

November 11, 2007


The staff at 3Dwalkthroughs.com is currently visiting Charleston, South Carolina to meet with one of the top real estate agents in the nation. During our down time we were able to check out some of the sights and sounds of downtown Charleston. We became friendly with former New Yorkers and current owners of the contemporary clothing and accessories store BZAR. It must have been our lucky day as it turned out the owners were hosting a huge party at the site of a very ambitious new development project. The party featured artists, DJ’s and breakdancers (the breakdancers were certainly not from New York).

After returning home from the party we investigated this development project further. The project entitled Noisette, is being developed on a 3,000 acre plot of land in North Charleston. The website provides intimate details of the project including some 3D Renderings and video. In an effort to make sure all the details of this impressive project are explained correctly, please read the description below taken directly from their website. For such a large project they are the perfect candidate for our 3D Walkthroughs, 3D Renderings and 3D Floor Plans.

Here is the description of the project. Source: Noisettesc.com website.

What is Noisette?
Noisette is a 3,000 acre city-within-a-city. It is an area of North Charleston, South Carolina targeted for integrated restoration as a sustainable community – modeled on the belief that cities must be equally responsive to social needs, environmental responsibility and economic vitality (the philosophy embodied by people, planet, prosperity).

The Noisette community boundaries are roughly those that defined North Charleston when that community was incorporated in 1973. However, in the last 30 years, through annexation and “green-field” subdivision development, North Charleston has expanded into one of the state’s largest cities. Today, the Noisette area represents only a small corner of its parent city.

What’s Noisette like today?
Located beside the Cooper River, the main tributary of the South’s most famous harbor, the Noisette area supports a racially and economically diverse population of 13,000 people, plus a daily influx of thousands of workers, shoppers, students and others. It includes a wide mix of neighborhoods, retail areas, industries, schools, municipal buildings and parks, many of which have remained relatively stable in profile despite the rapid development of the Charleston/North Charleston metropolitan area.

For example, historic Noisette neighborhoods like Liberty Hill – founded in 1878 as a community of freed slaves – include many homes occupied by fifth generation owners. The layout of Park Circle, a mixed-use recreation center designed in the late 19th century, still reflects its original vision as a leisurely melting pot for residents and visitors. The East Montague Avenue business district looks much as it did in the days of two-dollar haircuts.

Other assets of interest include a network of tidal creeks, marshes and protected wetlands bordering the Cooper River. There’s also a range of well-preserved architectural structures and details, especially on property developed by the U.S. Navy. Their engineers arrived in 1901 to build a major base and shipyard, then the Navy’s collection of residential and industrial structures was vacated during the base closures of 1995. That base closure was the trigger for development of the Noisette concept.

Who’s behind the Noisette project?
In a unique public-private partnership, the Noisette Company and the City of North Charleston teamed up in the late 1990s to revitalize the Noisette area. In exchange for the right to purchase 400 acres of old Navy base property at the city-appriased fair market value – a small portion of the land promised to the city after the Navy’s departure – Noisette Company principal John Knott agreed to launch a master planning effort on an unprecedented scale.

The master plan would:
Outline Noisette Company plans for the development of their proprietary section of the old Navy base, and help guide the city’s efforts to redevelop the adjacent 2,600 acres of private residential neighborhoods, private commercial structures, and municipal property.

Contracting with two of the country’s premier architectural and land planning firms, and in consultation with an international group of environmental, social and professional organizations, Knott’s team created an outline for restoration of a healthy, sustainable, human-scale community.

The plan seeks to preserve historic architectural styles, neighborhood diversity and the area’s unique social fabric. It also works to restore environmental stability and beauty, attract jobs, improve services like education and healthcare, reduce dependence on car travel, promote recreation, eliminate the foundations of crime and poverty, and strengthen the sense of pride many North Charleston resident feel toward their community.

After years of development, community input and revisions, the master plan was presented to the City of North Charleston in December 2003. It was reviewed in community meetings, neighborhood gatherings and private one-on-one sessions. And it was accepted by the City as satisfaction of the Noisette Company’s contractual agreement in early 2004.


Noisette – New Development Project in South Caroina

November 11, 2007


The staff at 3Dwalkthroughs.com is currently visiting Charleston, South Carolina to meet with one of the top real estate agents in the nation. During our down time we were able to check out some of the sights and sounds of downtown Charleston. We became friendly with former New Yorkers and current owners of the contemporary clothing and accessories store BZAR. It must have been our lucky day as it turned out the owners were hosting a huge party at the site of a very ambitious new development project. The party featured artists, DJ’s and breakdancers (the breakdancers were certainly not from New York).

After returning home from the party we investigated this development project further. The project entitled Noisette, is being developed on a 3,000 acre plot of land in North Charleston. The website provides intimate details of the project including some 3D Renderings and video. In an effort to make sure all the details of this impressive project are explained correctly, please read the description below taken directly from their website. For such a large project they are the perfect candidate for our 3D Walkthroughs, 3D Renderings and 3D Floor Plans.

Here is the description of the project. Source: Noisettesc.com website.

What is Noisette?
Noisette is a 3,000 acre city-within-a-city. It is an area of North Charleston, South Carolina targeted for integrated restoration as a sustainable community – modeled on the belief that cities must be equally responsive to social needs, environmental responsibility and economic vitality (the philosophy embodied by people, planet, prosperity).

The Noisette community boundaries are roughly those that defined North Charleston when that community was incorporated in 1973. However, in the last 30 years, through annexation and “green-field” subdivision development, North Charleston has expanded into one of the state’s largest cities. Today, the Noisette area represents only a small corner of its parent city.

What’s Noisette like today?
Located beside the Cooper River, the main tributary of the South’s most famous harbor, the Noisette area supports a racially and economically diverse population of 13,000 people, plus a daily influx of thousands of workers, shoppers, students and others. It includes a wide mix of neighborhoods, retail areas, industries, schools, municipal buildings and parks, many of which have remained relatively stable in profile despite the rapid development of the Charleston/North Charleston metropolitan area.

For example, historic Noisette neighborhoods like Liberty Hill – founded in 1878 as a community of freed slaves – include many homes occupied by fifth generation owners. The layout of Park Circle, a mixed-use recreation center designed in the late 19th century, still reflects its original vision as a leisurely melting pot for residents and visitors. The East Montague Avenue business district looks much as it did in the days of two-dollar haircuts.

Other assets of interest include a network of tidal creeks, marshes and protected wetlands bordering the Cooper River. There’s also a range of well-preserved architectural structures and details, especially on property developed by the U.S. Navy. Their engineers arrived in 1901 to build a major base and shipyard, then the Navy’s collection of residential and industrial structures was vacated during the base closures of 1995. That base closure was the trigger for development of the Noisette concept.

Who’s behind the Noisette project?
In a unique public-private partnership, the Noisette Company and the City of North Charleston teamed up in the late 1990s to revitalize the Noisette area. In exchange for the right to purchase 400 acres of old Navy base property at the city-appriased fair market value – a small portion of the land promised to the city after the Navy’s departure – Noisette Company principal John Knott agreed to launch a master planning effort on an unprecedented scale.

The master plan would:
Outline Noisette Company plans for the development of their proprietary section of the old Navy base, and help guide the city’s efforts to redevelop the adjacent 2,600 acres of private residential neighborhoods, private commercial structures, and municipal property.

Contracting with two of the country’s premier architectural and land planning firms, and in consultation with an international group of environmental, social and professional organizations, Knott’s team created an outline for restoration of a healthy, sustainable, human-scale community.

The plan seeks to preserve historic architectural styles, neighborhood diversity and the area’s unique social fabric. It also works to restore environmental stability and beauty, attract jobs, improve services like education and healthcare, reduce dependence on car travel, promote recreation, eliminate the foundations of crime and poverty, and strengthen the sense of pride many North Charleston resident feel toward their community.

After years of development, community input and revisions, the master plan was presented to the City of North Charleston in December 2003. It was reviewed in community meetings, neighborhood gatherings and private one-on-one sessions. And it was accepted by the City as satisfaction of the Noisette Company’s contractual agreement in early 2004.


New Search Tool in Second Life Helps Users Find 3D Objects

November 6, 2007

Second Life recently released a search tool built on a platform available from Google to help residents find 3D Objects more easily. In the past residents could perform very general searches but did not have the ability to find specific objects or events.

The new tool will list the results of a search in order of relevance as opposed to just listing them alphabetically. Jeska Dzwigalski, who is in charge of community and product development at Linden Lab, explains that the tool also allows residents to search much more specifically. In addition to being able to search for objects, residents can now look for information–about hobbies, for example–in each other’s profiles. Dzwigalski says she expects that being able to search profile information will improve Second Life’s social features.

Credit: Linden Lab

As Second Life and various other 3D virtual worlds gain popularity, the ability to search for specific 3D objects/events/profiles will only help to improve their social networking and e-commerce capabilities. In order for 3D objects to show up in a search the object must be tagged so the search engine can recognize them.

A good search engine for 3D objects will also become much more important as applications are launched that allow residents of one virtual world to pass into other virtual worlds. The challenge of making a search engine interconnect within various virtual worlds compares to the early days of creating a search engine for the internet.

3Dwalkthroughs.com has been actively speaking with a few virtual world technology companies about integrating our 3D Renderings and 3D Walkthroughs into their virtual worlds. The goal is to produce a much more realistic virtual experience.
In the next few years we believe the lines will truly be blurred between virtual and reality.


Get Out Your 3D Credit Cards – Virtual Shopping is Coming To a Computer Near You

October 21, 2007

Boston based, Kinset Inc. has announced the launch of Kinset 3D Stores. This new technology gives retailers the ability to build 3D virtual stores that have the same look and feel as their real life brick and mortar stores.

In the next 6 months Brookstone and Tweeter will launch online virtual stores created with the Kinset technology. Currently there are 2 stores available for testing out the technology, a bookstore and an electronics emporium. These stores have over 10,000 items on display with a purchasing mechanism integrated with Amazon.com.

“Powerful personal computers and fast broadband Web connectivity allowed us to build the first software technology that can present realistic online stores in 3D” said John Butler, CEO of Kinset.

Shopping in one of the Kinset virtual stores involves downloading a free piece of software. (the download was very quick and takes up very little space). One of nice features of downloading the software is the frequent updates that occur whenever a user logs into their account.

The 3Dwalkthroughs.com staff has downloaded the public store and found the shopping experience very easy and fun to use. We imagine that the Kinset technology will eventually move away from a strictly Amazon based purchasing mechanism.

Earlier attempts at building 3D online stores couldn’t handle the thousands of items on display in real stores but this has been overcome as a result of improved computer processing speeds. As we have mentioned in previous posts, now that Intel is getting involved in building a 3D internet, we expect computer processing speeds to improve dramatically over the next year.

Very similar to a commercial property developer using our 3D walkthroughs, 3D floor plans and 3D renderings to test and market their concepts before their properties are built, Kinset software provides retailers the ability to test actual store designs, layouts and merchandising in a live testing environment. For example a retailer can create mulitple store designs with various product placements within the store, and then track the results using Kinset’s detailed analytical output.

We will certainly be following the progress of this company and look forward to seeing the other national retailers adopting this new technology.


NY Mets – At Least We Have a New Stadium To Look Forward To

October 1, 2007

I am sure that I speak for all NY Met Fans when I say…nothing, just stare at the TV in disbelief. What will go down in history as one of the biggest chokes in sports history has happened right in our backyard. Approximately 17 days ago the NY Mets had a 7 game lead in their division and were all but assured a playoff berth. Yesterday’s loss assured them of the contrary as they were officially knocked out of the playoff’s.

However, today is Monday and we must look on the bright side. In another year or so we will be moving into the new Citi Field Stadium. With the hard work of more than 400 skilled professionals, construction of Citi Field continues to progress at an accelerated pace this summer. I am blown as I witness the daily progress on my way to the 3Dwalkthroughs.com office every day. To see 3D Walkthroughs and 3D Renderings of the new Citi Field stadium go Here>>>

Progress Update Taken From NY Mets Website.

Approximately 70% of Citi Field’s structural steel frame has been installed.
More than 60% of the stadium concrete plank – the tiered concrete structures that will support the stadium seats – has been installed. This now includes the seating areas for the main concourse as well as portions of the Suite Level.

Out in center field, the main scoreboard steel supports have been set in place and the bridge at the Diamond Plaza that will one day overlook the bullpens has been constructed.

The brick façade, or architectural precast, is well on its way to totally enclosing the administration building, including the future retail/storefront space that fronts 126th Street. Fans traveling down Roosevelt Avenue can also see the rich brick exterior enveloping the south side of Citi Field continuing its march toward the Jackie Robinson Rotunda.


NY Mets – At Least We Have a New Stadium To Look Forward To

October 1, 2007

I am sure that I speak for all NY Met Fans when I say…nothing, just stare at the TV in disbelief. What will go down in history as one of the biggest chokes in sports history has happened right in our backyard. Approximately 17 days ago the NY Mets had a 7 game lead in their division and were all but assured a playoff berth. Yesterday’s loss assured them of the contrary as they were officially knocked out of the playoff’s.

However, today is Monday and we must look on the bright side. In another year or so we will be moving into the new Citi Field Stadium. With the hard work of more than 400 skilled professionals, construction of Citi Field continues to progress at an accelerated pace this summer. I am blown as I witness the daily progress on my way to the 3Dwalkthroughs.com office every day. To see 3D Walkthroughs and 3D Renderings of the new Citi Field stadium go Here>>>

Progress Update Taken From NY Mets Website.

Approximately 70% of Citi Field’s structural steel frame has been installed.
More than 60% of the stadium concrete plank – the tiered concrete structures that will support the stadium seats – has been installed. This now includes the seating areas for the main concourse as well as portions of the Suite Level.

Out in center field, the main scoreboard steel supports have been set in place and the bridge at the Diamond Plaza that will one day overlook the bullpens has been constructed.

The brick façade, or architectural precast, is well on its way to totally enclosing the administration building, including the future retail/storefront space that fronts 126th Street. Fans traveling down Roosevelt Avenue can also see the rich brick exterior enveloping the south side of Citi Field continuing its march toward the Jackie Robinson Rotunda.


NY Mets – At Least We Have a New Stadium To Look Forward To

October 1, 2007

I am sure that I speak for all NY Met Fans when I say…nothing, just stare at the TV in disbelief. What will go down in history as one of the biggest chokes in sports history has happened right in our backyard. Approximately 17 days ago the NY Mets had a 7 game lead in their division and were all but assured a playoff berth. Yesterday’s loss assured them of the contrary as they were officially knocked out of the playoff’s.

However, today is Monday and we must look on the bright side. In another year or so we will be moving into the new Citi Field Stadium. With the hard work of more than 400 skilled professionals, construction of Citi Field continues to progress at an accelerated pace this summer. I am blown as I witness the daily progress on my way to the 3Dwalkthroughs.com office every day. To see 3D Walkthroughs and 3D Renderings of the new Citi Field stadium go Here>>>

Progress Update Taken From NY Mets Website.

Approximately 70% of Citi Field’s structural steel frame has been installed.
More than 60% of the stadium concrete plank – the tiered concrete structures that will support the stadium seats – has been installed. This now includes the seating areas for the main concourse as well as portions of the Suite Level.

Out in center field, the main scoreboard steel supports have been set in place and the bridge at the Diamond Plaza that will one day overlook the bullpens has been constructed.

The brick façade, or architectural precast, is well on its way to totally enclosing the administration building, including the future retail/storefront space that fronts 126th Street. Fans traveling down Roosevelt Avenue can also see the rich brick exterior enveloping the south side of Citi Field continuing its march toward the Jackie Robinson Rotunda.